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Who likes science...
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yoekie2346
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Messages: 4 , Offline
Just wondering.
Is there anyone out there that likes or loves science?
Just wondering.
ME...
DEFINETLY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I AM A NERD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
NOTE: IF YOU WANT TO YOU MAY TYPE IN WHAT YOU LIKE BETTER!!!!!!! REMEMBER PEOPLE, JUST COMMENTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  
DexGypMom
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Messages: 2665 , Offline

I do love all aspects of science from biological to astrophysics. In particular, I enjoy the study of the human body and all the mechanics, zoology, biology and quantum physics. I am amazed at some of the minds in science like Michio Kaku, Steven Hawking, Louis Leakey, Michael Debakey, Madame Curie, Einstein,.....I could go on for days. Yes...I do love science yoekie2346.

~MaryBeth

 
justhank
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Messages: 188 , Offline
well what do you know ? i do enjoy science. after high school, i studied and earned my Bachelors of Science in Mechanical Engineering. i wanted to work a year or two then go back to get a masters degree in physics. life got in the way. but i still love physics, i downloaded Einstiens Theory of Relativity which he wrote (a translation), and Steven hawkings lectures on the nature of time and space. i could go on but maybe we can talk about it sometime. how about that. we have something in common.  
DexGypMom
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Messages: 2665 , Offline

I actually have the hard cover for Einstein's General Theory of Relativity. I was studying to become a Civil Engineer when life got in the way, so stuck with my little Associates Degree in Architectural Technology. I'm a certified board draftsman with CEV credits in CAD, MicroStation and Digital Cartography which was my vocation for 26 of my 32 years with AT&T. Quite frankly, linear algebra sunk me. Imaginery numbers, square roots of negative numbers, & matrices were beyond what my brain could handle while working full time and doing desktop publishing and CAD illustrations on the side. I started college with intentions of becoming a doctor but changed my mind wanting to be a medical illustrator. Seems I just didn't know where to lay my egg. CLUCK Seems I'm a jack of all trades but master of none. Now I'm old & decrepit.....and the best job I could get is a volunteer moderator on a game site. So, yes, guess we would have a few topics to chat about.

~MaryBeth

 
uhuru1701
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Messages: 1061 , Offline
I was born in 1950 and a girl growing up in the 1950's was not encouraged by the educational system to get involved in science. I was a girl. I was a fanatic in all things science. I was blessed that both parents were teachers and my mother and female lineage were all strong feminists without even understanding the politics of the word. My mother encouraged me to be anything I wanted to be and made up for anything the school system was lacking. I was most fortunate.

I loved astronomy and was a lot like the child Jodie Foster character in "Contact." My mother signed me up for the astronomy book of the month club and took me on trips to the observatory.

I wanted to be a pediatric heart surgeon (a relatively new field at the time) because I spent so much time in hospitals with doctors who were needlessly worried about my heart. Silly doctors. Somebody had to get in there and do the job right.

I was going to be a research chemist and along the way, I blew up three chemistry sets. A few years back, I was in my garage looking for something and came across the burned-out shell of one of them. My mother kept that thing all these years. Amazing. Each time I had another disaster (one sending our whole family to a motel for the night because the stench was so bad), my mother would say, "Don't worry, honey, you'll do better next time." And she'd buy me another chemistry set so I could play mad scientist.

After being passionate about many fields of science, I was narrowing in on oceanography and marine biology because I wanted to go join Jacque Cousteau and travel the world's oceans and study all those fascinating things and be just like Mr. Cousteau.

But, I still loved sitting back in the planetarium and watching the universe unfold.

I was such a lover of science but I was only one little girl (with one smart Mommy) and I couldn't beat the system forever and when a teacher actually says the words, "Girls don't like science" to you... well, you get your passion beat out of you eventually. I was never once called on by any science teacher when students raised their hands in response to something. Two, three years went by and I was 100% ignored by science teachers so when I finally confronted one teacher, the "girls don't like science" line was his justification for ignoring me.

Albert Einstein, Stephen Hawking, Madame Curie, Aristotle, Galileo, Ptolemy, Carl Sagan and all men and women who elevated any field of science by their genius are among my heros.

I saw Stephen Hawking on an episode of "Star Trek TNG" and he was playing 3D chess with Albert Einstein and another famous scientist and they'd given him a line or two of dialog to say through his mechanical speech device. I later read an interview with him that said that was one of the happiest and most exciting things he'd ever done, playing a role on Star Trek because that was his favorite show and he was a devoted Trekkie.  
justhank
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Messages: 188 , Offline
Ladies, on behalf of all of us stupid men. i appologize to you. you make us think we're smart. but everything we do is for you. to impress you. so you'll talk to us. or leave us gazing unable to think forget talking. you are proof that there isa god, and he likes us. with all of the wonders of the universe around us, we'd rather go to bed early tonight. set my alarm for 3 a.m. (i can sleep later ... at work). thank you Jesus.  
justhank
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Messages: 188 , Offline
i wasn't finished. thank you hank.
some of the most important advancement in science were by women, the double helix structure of DNA, i could go on. but you never get the recognition. "behind every famous man .... there's a woman ..... rolling her eyes.".

i think that the real genious is Stephen Hawking's interpreter.
mb, the more i know of you , the more i am amazed. some eggs require a bit more incubation. and you don't have to master everything. being damn goodis always acceptable. i also do CAD work. i've had gigs at general atomics, a small part of Fussion reseach.  
caboose22
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Messages: 167 , Offline
DNA is cool
RNA is more cool
 
volo83
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Messages: 164 , Offline
I too was born in 1950, but my experience was very different.
Perhaps because my teachers were young, we were encouraged to study math and science.The Space Race was going on.
I was always curious about how things work and had tolerant encouraging parent that let me take stuff apart.
I was alway watching my Dad fix stuff and pestering him with questions.
Science is COOL!  

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at Sun, 2 Aug 2009 09:46

uhuru1701
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Messages: 1061 , Offline
caboose22 wrote:DNA is cool
RNA is more cool


Humans and chimpanzees share about 98 percent of the same genes.


Remember...

Soylent Green is people!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at Sun, 2 Aug 2009 12:31

caboose22
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Messages: 167 , Offline
Chimpanzees are cool  
inewton
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Messages: 94 , Offline
I love reading about all sciences--it's all about the discovery. If I didn't get my bachelor's in music, it would have been in geology from UA Fairbanks. I would have become a glaciologist, studying up in Alaska, where I grew up. I would have become involved with all the global warming effects of glaciers. Life certainly takes us on different journeys.

I'M COOL BECAUSE I LOVE GLACIERS, AND GLACIERS ARE MILLIONS OF YEARS COOL!!! (not to say that I'm millions of years old!! LOL)

GLACIAL ICEWORMS ARE COOL!  

This message was edited 3 times. Last update was at Sun, 2 Aug 2009 23:13

inewton
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Messages: 94 , Offline
FAR from being an expert in string theory, only having a very basic understanding, I hypothesize that music supports string theory. Music has been a part of every culture known to man. There was even a flute found that may have been Neanderthal. I believe music is innate--that people are born with some ability to create or relate to music, to organize and make sense of it. Also, every culture has tried to seek their creator, with music playing some part in this. Music and shamanism were equivalent in ancient tribal cultures. Somewhere in the creation and participation in music (including just listening), maybe we are in a way experiencing a part of our creation thru vibrations.

OK--if you know more about string theory, help me out. I know my hypothesis is on the weak side LOL.  
justhank
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Messages: 188 , Offline
String theory proposes that the fundamental structures of all matter are tiny string-like objects that maybe open ended (strins with two ends) or closed looped strings, aor combinations of each with variable vibrationary states. how they combine results in every form of matter in the universe. this theory also allows for the possibility of more than the three dimensions that we comprehend (four when you include the man made dimension of time). like strings on a violin, this tinystrings can manefest themselves into various forms because of how they vibrate. the violin string generates various notes or sound pitches , but it's still only one string.

i happen to be a musician, and for me music is the language of the angels and god. listen to some music of Bach ... "air on a G string" .... (how appropriate).
they say that singing is angels praying (praising god). it can tame the savage beast, or bring you to tears. powerful stuff.
does that help?  
inewton
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Messages: 94 , Offline
Thanks, JustHank. It's fascinating, the idea of strings vibrating into different dimensions. Music is much simpler in that sense! I still wonder...  
caboose22
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Messages: 167 , Offline
Cool explanation on string theory
Could have used that in college

String theory is cool  
justhank
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Messages: 188 , Offline
since we're on the subjects of music, strings ..... a joke................

three notes a C, an Eb (E flat... sorry) and G, walk into a bar (no punn intended). the bartender takes one look at them and says "Sorry, we don't serve minors!"

so the Eb leaves and the C and G split a fifth.  
inewton
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Messages: 94 , Offline
Very cool joke!! You're cool, JustHank!  
DexGypMom
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Messages: 2665 , Offline

Hank -- I bet you thought you got away with the Bach reference and a certain string but you didn't buddy......busted. Personally, I love JS Bach's, Toccata in D minor & Fugue in G Minor. A neighbor gave me a complete record collection of Bach's organ works, 116 in all, performed on pipe organs all over Europe when I was 13. I played my favorites until the stylus wrecked the grooves. Too bad my mom's hi-fi stereo didn't have an equalizer, I would have blown out the speakers with the base of the pedals. Oh...the joke was really lame....only a very drunk piano player would gaffaw at that baby. Sorry

String Theory is Michio Kaku's baby, right? I saw him explaining it on a PBS series, Nova. I do not recall if he likened the strings to an instrument but he spoke of how strings allow space to bend. He made a reference to Star Trek sighting how the Enterprise could have stood still in 3D space but could have traveled for hundreds of light years away in a series of string vibrations versus the warp bubble Gene Roddenberry used. It was a fascinating analogy because it means we could travel back or forwards in our linear time line without leaving our 3D world. Now that's COOL.

So you were a CAD technician, too. How many packages did you have to learn? I used Cadkey, DataCAD, Microstation, & AutoCAD. I am most proficient in Microstation seeing as it was the base CAD package of our engineering software on the job though I did have to use AutoCAD for file clean up and translation into Microstation. AutoCAD is cheaper than Microstation so more surveryors and civil engineering firms used AC. Well must get back to my little job here. Later...
~MaryBeth

 
inewton
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Messages: 94 , Offline
*hic* Gotanotherbeer? *hic* I need one before I crank out another tune on my piano.

I'm impressed DexGypMom. What is CAD?  
uhuru1701
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Messages: 1061 , Offline
Dex, have you ever listened to the soundtrack from the movie, "Rollerball***?" I loved to put that on, put on the headphones, then crank up the volume. Awesome.

***I'm talking about the original Rollerball with James Caan, I believe.

READ THE REVIEW OF THE SOUNDTRACK. I think you will understand.

LISTEN TO SAMPLES HERE (you have to click on the link on the left side of the page under the image)

Samples include excerpts from:

Bach: Toccata in D Minor
Shostakovitch: Symphony No. 8: First Movement
Previn: Glass Sculpture
Previn: Executive Party
Shostakovitch: Symphony No. 5: Third Movement
Albinoni: Adagio
Tchaikovsky: Sleeping Beauty Waltz
Previn: Executive Party Dance
Shostakovitch: Symphony No. 5: Fourth Movement

I'm especially fond of the Bach Toccata and Albinoni's Adagio.  

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at Tue, 4 Aug 2009 12:49

uhuru1701
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Messages: 1061 , Offline
And going to a planetarium show when they play the crashing classical music is pretty cool, too.  
inewton
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Messages: 94 , Offline
Uhuru, by "crashing classical music" do you mean Tchaikovsky's 1812 overture with the cymbals and cannons? I'll have to check out the Rollerball soundtrack, too. I like soundtracks. I'm with you on Shostakovitch--love his symphonies. I played one in symphony orchestra in high school, I'm thinking it was his 6th. I think I still have the recording.

Did you know that the very first start of notes, called the attack, on different instruments are what make it possible to tell the difference between instruments? Each instrument has their own unique set of frequencies (sound wave vibrations per second) at the attack. If you take the attack off the front of the note (with an instrument called an oscilloscope), a flute will sound almost exactly the same as the trumpet and violin, for example.  
uhuru1701
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Messages: 1061 , Offline
Symphonies are good for planets and outer space, too. Just as long as it doesn't start sounding like let's-keep-people-calm music like they play in mental institutions (a la One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest).  
inewton
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Messages: 94 , Offline
Or Clockwork Orange. I couldn't listen to Beethoven's 9th for quite a while after seeing that crazy movie.  
DexGypMom
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Messages: 2665 , Offline
inewton wrote:*hic* Gotanotherbeer? *hic* I need one before I crank out another tune on my piano.

I'm impressed DexGypMom. What is CAD?

Depending on the software package and/or application, CAD stands for Computer Aided Drafting or CADD, Computer Aided Drafting & Design. Either is acceptable when describing the function of creating scaled documents with the assistance of an engineering software package on a computer workstation. The workstation consists of 1 or 2 monitors sitting above a digitizing board with a 12 or 16 button programmable puck used as an input device. The digitizing board can be as small as 12" X 12" and can go up to 60" X 36". My workstation was a dualscreen with a 42" X 36" digitizing table with a 12 button puck.

~MaryBeth

 
DexGypMom
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Messages: 2665 , Offline

Yes Uhuru, I have scene Rollerball and found the soundtrack the only redeeming quality of that movie. I do like classical music and opera but not across the board. I am picky about what I'll listen, too. I'm the same way with modern music. That's why it's a waste for me to buy an entire album or CD when I may only like one song. I'm just weird like that.

~MaryBeth

 
justhank
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Messages: 188 , Offline
sorry i'm late. some very interesting comments submitted here. string theory, bach, star trek, cadds. and G-strings. MaryBeth, not everything i say carries hidden sexual inferences. the compositoin , by J.S. Bach, which i refered to is titled "air on the G string". i've included a link so that you can hear it. i hope you do, it is one of my favorites. i believe you will like it.

http://www.break.com/usercontent/2009/6/bach-air-on-the-g-string-string-orchestra-788798.html

this video has the four piece sheet music scrolling across as you hear the music playing.

And yes , the major feature of String Theory is that these "strings" can combine to produce all type of matter becuase of their ability to have various vibrational states. the beauty of the theory is simplicity ... few fundamental parts that make up the universe. in the early days of sub-atomic particle colliders the number of fundamental particles began to grow from 4 to 30 + the joke in the Physics was that you became famous if you didn't fnd a new particle. soon they realized that they were all the same basic component in different states.

such hostillity about my joke ... it could only meam one thimg .... it went over your head , you didn't get it.. how about this one
how many female vocalists does it take to change a light bulb .............one. she merely holds the bulbi n one hand , over her rheadhe world revolves around her.

i really got to get some rest. will continue iin morning.  
uhuru1701
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Messages: 1061 , Offline
Who was hostile to you Hank? You want I should beat anybody up for you? Hey, when do your pals get to call you Hankie? You can talk about G-strings all you want. We're listening.  
inewton
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Messages: 94 , Offline
I got your 1st joke, JustHank, thought it was funny. Thanks for more info on string theory--that is sooo cool, the simplicity of it that you mentioned. I wonder what these "strings" are made of.

Thanks for the link. I've heard Air on G String many times, but I always like to hear new performances, varied interpretations.  
justhank
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Messages: 188 , Offline
ok, breaks over. i think we've run String theory into the ground. let's move on. did you get a chance to hear "Air" (on the G String)? i hope so. one of Bach's best works. he composed so much music. he created the "Tempered Scale" (A=440hz) that is used to this day. Many of his compositions have been on our Billboard charts. let's see there's "Lighter Shade of Pale" by Proco Harem, "loves serinade" by Petulia Clark, some of my personal favorites include
"Sleepers Awake!", "Prelude in C major", "Ave Maria", Toccata and Fugue in D minor (he wrote that before he saw the phantom of the opera),"Joy of Man's Desire". enough already.

MaryBeth, i was first trained to operate Computervision's CADDS4X mainframe system. PC's hadn't come out yet. now i primarily use Autocad. it's a powerful tool. i've used Catia, and others. I have worked as an Engineering consultant since 1986. worked at places like Solar Turbines, Boeing, Department of Defense, and General Atomics. I was lucky enough to get the chance to work on the Nuclear Fussion research project . i was only doing CADDS work for the real geniouses, the physicist. But i felt like i was working on the most noble project on earth, for the betterment of mankind. truely amazing, cutting edge technology.. let me give you an idea of how amazing this was. the fussion reactor (the vessel) was a toroid shaped (dounut shaped) chamber 20 feet high and 20 feet in diameter, constructed of Stainless Steel because it's non magnetic. the iside is lines with graphite tiles 1 foot thick. these protected the vessel from the supert hot Hydrogen plasma that was forced to spin around the chamber, away from the walls, my magnetic fiields, produced by cyrogenicly cooled super conducting electro magnetic coils that encircled the vessel radially and diametricly. and it required half of the electrical power produced by a fission reactor at San Enofre,
it required two weeks to pump down the interior chamber pressure to create a vaccuum, using Molecular pumps. you can understand how impressive this was or is.
"what a piece of work is man. how noble in reason. how infinite in facualty. in thought and motion, how like a god"

William Shakespear

one last thought. Is Time travel possible? ..................... yes ! ..................... we're doing it right now.  
inewton
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Messages: 94 , Offline
It was cool having the sheet music scroll along to Air on a G string. I played along on the top line with my flute. It was very cool! JustHank, what instrument/s do you play? I also play a little rhythm guitar.  
 
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